Ohio Auto Insurance Quotes

If you don't have proof of financial responsibility, you can't legally operate a motor vehicle in the state of Ohio. But you probably already knew this, and while you could go out and secure a $30,000 bond for this purpose, an overwhelming number of Buckeye residents recognize it makes the most sense to purchase traditional auto insurance. To do this, simply fill out our brief online form. If you're not sure about what to expect or what you need from your auto insurance, take a moment to read this basic information about auto insurance in Ohio.

Ohio Auto Insurance Quotes: Average Cost

The average cost of Ohio auto insurance quotes was $628 in 2006, the last year for which reliable data is available, compared to $795 nationwide. But this doesn't tell the whole story. Not only does Ohio consistently rank in the top 15 for least expensive auto insurance, it does so despite relatively high population density. This makes Ohio an aberration, as population density is one of the strongest indicators of auto insurance costs.

Low minimum coverage requirements certainly help, but they can't adequately explain the state's lower costs. After all, right next door, Pennsylvania has similar insurance requirements and population density, but the Keystone State had an average auto insurance cost of $820 in 2006. One large and underrated factor is that despite the high population density, Ohio's population is, nevertheless spread out. Instead of a hyper-dense Philadelphia, the Buckeye State has Cincy, Columbus, and Cleveland with a wide spattering of mid-size cities (Dayton, Toledo, Akron, Youngstown, etc.).

Ohio Auto Insurance: Minimum Coverage

Ohio auto insurance is what's known as a 12.5/25/7.5 state. This means you're required to carry $12,500 for bodily injury liability per person, $25,000 for bodily injury per accident, and $7,500 for property damage liability. These are among the lowest in the country and may not be enough to cover all the damages incurred from an accident --needless to say, there are tons of vehicles out there worth more $7,500. Thus, even if you own an older vehicle and can justify foregoing collision and comprehensive auto insurance, you may want to purchase a policy with higher allowances for these basic liabilities. Otherwise, you may very well find yourself on the hook for tens of thousands of dollars of out-of-pocket expenses.

Ohio Auto Insurance Quotes: Primary Rate Factors

Along with the liability coverage and the size of your deductibles, there are a handful of primary factors that will greatly influence your individual rates. Indeed, don't assume the $628 average cost for annual premiums will reflect your individual premiums. Where you live, your driving record, your age, sex, marital status, and how much you drive your car and for what purposes can all have a substantial impact on what you pay. Many insurance companies offer discounts that will have a secondary impact. One of the most common examples of this type of discount is the "good student" discount for young drivers with good grades. Even what seems like a gimmicky discount is probably based on actuarial information: Teenagers who are home studying are less likely to go joyriding.

Finding Ohio Auto Insurance Quotes

Ohio auto insurance quotes are easy to find but stressful to comparison shop and, ultimately, try to choose the best policy and insurer for you. One thing is certain: One size does not fit all and competition is the best thing the consumers have going for them. In fact, many insurance companies market their rates toward specific drivers. Some companies try to corner the market on low-risk or high-risk drivers by offering slightly lower premiums for certain profiles. Why would an insurance company target high-risk drivers? Well, although they certainly present greater risk to an insurance company, the overall profit margins may still be higher. Better yet, by using our online referral service, you can compare different quotes from the comfort and security of your own home, avoiding the high-pressure sales situation that often results from cold-calling insurance companies.