Report: Majority of hit-and-run collisions involve parked cars

Many drivers do not leave note explaining the incident.

Auto insurance may invaluable for drivers while they're behind the wheel - and after they park the car, according to data released Wednesday by a major auto insurance company.

The data showed that 69 percent of hit-and-run collisions involve parked vehicles. The highest rates of these incidents were seen in New York City, Los Angeles and Chicago, according to the report. Driving distractions like turning on the radio or checking a cellphone can make it more difficult to maneuver a vehicle and increase the likelihood of hitting parked cars.

"Leaving the scene of an accident without stopping is a very serious matter," said Bill Daly, vice president of auto claims at the insurer. "If you caused damage to a vehicle you may be liable and can be held responsible."

After hitting a parked vehicle, drivers should leave a note explaining what happened. Victims of a hit-and-run may want to take pictures of the area, ask people nearby if they witnessed the collision, check for surveillance cameras and contact their insurer.

The average cost of auto insurance declined by 2.7 percent in 2007, according to the National Association of Insurance Commissioners. New York ranked fourth for most expensive at $1,047.ADNFCR-2378-ID-19621639-ADNFCR

Posted: February 17, 2010

Related Auto Insurance Articles