Poll: Almost half of Americans dislike texting while driving

Survey follows recent proposal to allow citation for such cellphone use.

Americans may be in line with lawmakers eager to cut back on distracted driving.

Text messaging topped a Synovate-eNation poll of most-hated behaviors while driving. Other actions include talking on a cellphone, reading a newspaper or map, using a TV or DVD and eating or drinking. About 45 percent of respondents were most opposed to texting, while 39 percent said talking on a cellphone was their most-hated behavior.

This survey follows an announcement by the U.S. Department of Transportation proposing a sample bill that would allow law enforcement officials to cite drivers caught text messaging behind the wheel. First-time offenders would be subjected to a minimum $75 fine and action against driving privileges under the law. Higher fines would be imposed for subsequent or serious offenses.

"Texting while driving, like talking on cell phones while driving, is an extremely dangerous and life-threatening practice," Secretary of Transportation Ray LaHood said in the announcement.

In addition to injuring those involved, these accidents may increase a driver's auto insurance premium. Several states have already enforced bans on cellphone use while driving. Text messaging while driving is banned in 18 states, plus the District of Columbia, while talking on a cellphone is banned in seven, plus the District of Columbia.ADNFCR-2378-ID-19638564-ADNFCR

Posted: February 25, 2010

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